JMIR Infodemiology

Focusing on determinants and distribution of health information and misinformation on the internet, and its effect on public and individual health.

Editor-in-Chief:

Tim Ken Mackey, MAS, PhD, University of California San Diego, USA


Impact Factor 2024

JMIR Infodemiology (JI, ISSN 2564-1891, Editor-in-Chief: Tim Ken Mackey) launched in 2021, is a PubMed Central/PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, DOAJ, Web of Science, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and CABI-indexed, peer-reviewed journal, focusing on infodemiology, the study of determinants and the distribution of health information and misinformation on the internet, and its effect on public and individual health. The new scientific discipline of "Infodemiology," first introduced in 2002, has been gaining momentum due to the COVID-19 infodemic, with the WHO recognizing it as an important pillar to manage public health emergencies. JMIR Publications is proud to have been spearheading the advancement of this new scientific discipline for more than a decade. We are now accelerating the development of this new interdisciplinary discipline with the first and only journal devoted to this rapidly evolving field, by bringing together thought leaders in research, data science, and policy. Areas of interest include information monitoring (infoveillance, including social listening); ehealth literacy and science literacy; knowledge refinement and quality improvement processes and policies; and the influence of political and commercial interests on effective knowledge translation. 

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Misinformation and Disinformation Outbreaks and Information Prevalence Studies

TikTok is one of the most-used and fastest-growing social media platforms in the world, and recent reports indicate that it has become an increasingly popular source of news and information in the United States. These trends have important implications for public health because an abundance of health information exists on the platform. Women are among the largest group of TikTok users in the United States and may be especially affected by the dissemination of health information on TikTok. Prior research has shown that women are not only more likely to look for information on the internet but are also more likely to have their health-related behaviors and perceptions affected by their involvement with social media.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infoveillance and Social Listening

Attitudes toward the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and accuracy of information shared about this topic in web-based settings vary widely. As real-time, global exposure to web-based discourse about HPV immunization shapes the attitudes of people toward vaccination, the spread of misinformation and misrepresentation of scientific knowledge contribute to vaccine hesitancy.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infoveillance and Social Listening

Abortion (also known as termination of pregnancy) is an essential element of women’s reproductive health care. Feedback from women who underwent medical termination of pregnancy about their experience is crucial to help practitioners identify women’s needs and develop necessary tools to improve the abortion care process. However, the collection of this feedback is quite challenging. Social media offer anonymity for women who share their abortion experience.

|
Article Thumbnail
Assessing and Building eHealth / Digital Literacy in Populations

Health misinformation on social media can negatively affect knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, undermining clinical care and public health efforts. Therefore, it is vital to better understand the public’s experience with health misinformation on social media.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infoveillance and Social Listening

Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune condition that is associated with significant detriments to quality of life and daily functioning. TikTok, a popular social networking platform for sharing short videos, provides a unique opportunity to understand experiences with LE within a nonclinical sample, a population that is understudied in LE research. This is the first qualitative study that explores LE experiences using the TikTok platform.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infodemic Management

Despite being a pandemic, the impact of the spread of COVID-19 extends beyond public health, influencing areas such as the economy, education, work style, and social relationships. Research studies that document public opinions and estimate the long-term potential impact after the pandemic can be of value to the field.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infodemic Management

Self-harm and suicide are major public health concerns worldwide, with attention focused on the web environment as a helpful or harmful influence. Longitudinal research on self-harm and suicide–related internet use is limited, highlighting a paucity of evidence on long-term patterns and effects of engaging with such content.

|
Article Thumbnail
Data Sources and Open Data for Infodemiology

Social media posts by clinicians are not bound by the same rules as peer-reviewed publications, raising ethical concerns that have not been extensively characterized or quantified.

|
Article Thumbnail
Research Letter

Despite challenges related to the data quality, representativeness, and accuracy of artificial intelligence–driven tools, commercially available social listening platforms have many of the attributes needed to be used for digital public health surveillance of human papillomavirus vaccination misinformation in the online ecosystem.

|
Article Thumbnail
Health and Risk Communication

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, social media has served as a channel of communication, a venue for entertainment, and a mechanism for information dissemination.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infoveillance and Social Listening

The COVID-19 pandemic prompted global behavioral restrictions, impacting public mental health. Sentiment analysis, a tool for assessing individual and public emotions from text data, gained importance amid the pandemic. This study focuses on Japan’s early public health interventions during COVID-19, utilizing sentiment analysis in infodemiology to gauge public sentiment on social media regarding these interventions.

|

We are working in partnership with